Syntax Guide

Note

This documentation utilized the Markedly Structured Text (MyST) syntax.

Exercise Directive

An exercise directive can be included using the exercise pattern. The directive is enumerated by default and can take in an optional title argument. The following options are also supported:

  • label : text

    A unique identifier for your exercise that you can use to reference it with {ref} and {numref}. Cannot contain spaces or special characters.

  • class : text

    Value of the exercise’s class attribute which can be used to add custom CSS or JavaScript.

  • nonumber : flag (empty)

    Turns off exercise auto numbering.

Example

Exercise 1

Recall that \(n!\) is read as “\(n\) factorial” and defined as \(n! = n \times (n - 1) \times \cdots \times 2 \times 1\).

There are functions to compute this in various modules, but let’s write our own version as an exercise.

In particular, write a function factorial such that factorial(n) returns \(n!\) for any positive integer \(n\).

MyST Syntax

```{exercise}
:label: my-exercise

Recall that $n!$ is read as "$n$ factorial" and defined as
$n! = n \times (n - 1) \times \cdots \times 2 \times 1$.

There are functions to compute this in various modules, but let's
write our own version as an exercise.

In particular, write a function `factorial` such that `factorial(n)` returns $n!$
for any positive integer $n$.
```

Source: QuantEcon

Referencing Exercises

You can refer to an exercise using the {ref} role like {ref}`my-exercise` , which will display the title of the exercise directive. In the event that directive does not have a title, the title will default to “Exercise” like so: Exercise.

Enumerable directives can also be referenced through the numref role like {numref}`my-exercise` , which will display the number of the exercise directive. Referencing the above directive will display Exercise 1. Furthermore, numref can take in three additional placeholders: %s and {number} which get replaced by the exercise number and name by the exercise title.1

Solution Directive

A solution directive can be included using the solution pattern. It takes in the label of the directive it wants to link to as a required argument. Unlike the exercise directive, the solution directive is unenumerable. The following options are also supported:

  • label : text

    A unique identifier for your solution that you can use to reference it with {ref}. Cannot contain spaces or special characters.

  • class : text

    Value of the solution’s class attribute which can be used to add custom CSS or JavaScript.

Note

The title of the solution directive links directly to the referred directive.

Example

Solution to Exercise 1

Here’s one solution.

def factorial(n):
    k = 1
    for i in range(n):
        k = k * (i + 1)
    return k

factorial(4)

MyST Syntax

````{solution} my-exercise
:label: my-solution

Here's one solution.

```{code-block} python
def factorial(n):
    k = 1
    for i in range(n):
        k = k * (i + 1)
    return k

factorial(4)
```
````

Source: QuantEcon

Referencing Solutions

You can refer to a solution using the {ref} role like: {ref}`my-solution` the output of which depends on the attributes of the linked directive. If the linked directive is enumerable, the role will replace the solution reference with the linked directive type and its appropriate number like so: Solution to Exercise 1.

In the event that the directive being referenced is unenumerable, the reference will display its title: Solution to \(n!\) Factorial. Click the toggle to see the supporting directives.

Exercise (\(n!\) Factorial)

Write a function factorial such that factorial(int n) returns \(n!\) for any positive integer \(n\).

Solution to \(n!\) Factorial

Here’s a solution in Java.

static int factorial(int n){
    if (n == 0)
        return 1;
    else {
        return(n * factorial(n-1));
    }
}

If the title of the linked directive being reference does not exist, it will default to Solution to Exercise. Click the toggle to see the supporting directives.

Exercise

Write a function factorial such that factorial(int n) returns \(n!\) for any positive integer \(n\).

Solution to Exercise

Here’s a solution in Java.

static int factorial(int n){
    if (n == 0)
        return 1;
    else {
        return(n * factorial(n-1));
    }
}

How to Hide Directives

Directives can be hidden using the dropdown class which is available through Sphinx Book Theme. For Sphinx projects, add "sphinx_book_theme" to your html_theme in the conf.py to activate the theme in your Sphinx configuration

...
html_theme = "sphinx_book_theme"
...

Jupyter Book’s default theme is Sphinx Book Theme; therefore, Jupyter Book projects can utilize dropdown without having to activate the theme in your Sphinx configuration.

To hide the directive, simply add :class: dropdown as a directive option.

Example

MyST Syntax:

```{exercise}
:class: dropdown

Recall that $n!$ is read as "$n$ factorial" and defined as
$n! = n \times (n - 1) \times \cdots \times 2 \times 1$.

There are functions to compute this in various modules, but let's
write our own version as an exercise.

In particular, write a function `factorial` such that `factorial(n)` returns $n!$
for any positive integer $n$.
```

1

If the exercise directive does not have a title, an invalid numfig format warning will be displayed during build if the user tries to use the {name} placeholder.